Down by the Lake

Molecules icon

A major new update to Molecules, version 2.0, is now live on the App Store. This version brings an all-new renderer for newer iOS devices, one that is capable of beautiful, realistic 3-D graphics. You are now able to search the NCBI PubChem database of small molecule compounds, something people have been asking for since the launch of the application. In addition to this, the interface of the application has been streamlined and particularly improved on the iPad. As always, the latest source code of Molecules is available for download.

Read on for more about the new version of Molecules.

Molecules icon

A new version of Molecules is now available on the App Store. This adds iOS 4.0 multitasking and Retina display support, and fixes a number of issues that users have identified.

Read on for more about this update.

Rose-Hulman logo

Last quarter, Dr. David Fisher taught an introductory course on iOS development at my alma mater, the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He's made that course publicly available, including videos of the sessions, assignments, and tests. If you want, you can also grab the videos from his podcast on the subject.

I highly recommend checking out this course, because it has a huge amount of content within it and Dr. Fisher does a great job in presenting the material.

SecondConf logo

I've been invited to give a talk at the SecondConf developer conference in Chicago, and I'm writing this to accompany it. I'll be talking about using the GPU to accelerate processing of video on Mac and iOS. The slides for this talk are available here. The source code samples used in this talk will be linked throughout this article. Additionally, I'll refer to the course I teach on advanced iPhone development, which can be found on iTunes U here.

Read on for more on using the GPU to accelerate processing of video.

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